Skip to main content

Triathlon with a Summitcheeseburger bonus

<!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]-->

<!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--><!--[if !mso]> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <![endif]-->

Triathlon:

 

  1. Ski Pebble Creek Ski Area in Inkom, Idaho
  2. Soak in Lava Hot Springs
  3. Snowshoe near the Dome in Clifton, Idaho

 

The great part about the trip was being able to stay with Chuck and Jeanie at their geodesic dome home overlooking Twin Lakes, Idaho.  Being driving distance to Pebble Creek Ski Area and Lava Hot Springs, and a walk out the door to a Cheeseburger Summit, the dome was a perfect base for the Idaho adventure weekend.  We could see the peak from the dome, and on the map it looked to be about 2 or 3 miles away, so we donned our snowshoes and set off down the hill, across frozen and snow-covered Twin Lakes, over hills and fields covered with sage, snow, and lots of deer, and up to the peak.  The day was cool, crisp, partly sunny, and filled with incredibly beautiful views in all directions of rural Idaho and distant mountains.   Luckily Chuck had hamburger in the freezer that Groundround could fry up for the tasty cheeseburgers that we consumed at the summit.

Snowshoeing across Twin Lakes.  Little Mountain is the peak on the far right in the distance.

Almost there.

Found the survey marker.

Cheeseburgers on top.

Apres cheeseburgersummitting in front of the dome.

Mount Carmel

I have to quickly post this since it is the last day of the year and I have to get on record that the first peak in Connecticut was conquered in 2012! October 26, 2012 I wanted to take a hike with the family so we headed over to Sleeping Giant State Park to hike Mount Carmel. Unfortunately this is not the Mount Carmel of biblical fame, but the religious settlers of the area certainly named it after that mountain.  The mountain is also known as Sleeping Giant because the profile is supposed to look like a sleeping giant… Anyway, the high point of the mountain has a stone tower from which we took our pictures. The greatest thing I learned from this experience was that my thirteen month old son needs his own summit cheeseburger! We didn’t bring him one (he had never eaten a cheeseburger before), but we handed him my wife’s cheeseburger for a picture and he ended up eating half of it.

Hawkeye Point - 4/50 completed, 46 to go...

A weekend trip to visit a friends house in southwestern Minnesota does not contain many things to do. Something was needed to make the time pass in this rural farmland. I quickly realized that we would be within easy driving distance of Hawkeye Point. I had already climbed the highest points in Minnesota, Wisconsin and South Dakota and jumped at the chance to do it again in Iowa. I am officially a Summit Cheeseburgerer but not officially a High Pointer (someday soon I'll officially join them, for now its unofficial).


The summit was a very easy climb. It involved driving up to as far as your car could go, getting out and walking the 30 feet to the summit. While it was the highest point in Iowa it was hard to tell if other points were higher than it. The burgers eaten were purchased from a local fast food establishment. They were very delicious. The drive was the most difficult part as it was an hour away from my friends' house. It involved driving through the very dull Great Plains.

 

It was very nice of the Osceola County to set aside this land for people like me to use. There were four posts with each of the highest points in each state. It is interesting to note that Florida has the lowest high point of all 50 states at 325 feet above sea level.

 

I anxiously await another Cheeseburger and High Point Summit. 

 

Hmmm so good.

 

Being a tourist!

 

There are literally corn fields right next to this summit. 

Lookout Peak

We almost called off today's Cheeseburger Summit hike to Lookout Peak as the wind was really blowing this morning.  But we thought we'd hike anyway as the dogs needed some exercise and it was pretty warm for December.  We were pleasantly surprised when we arrived at the Killyon's Canyon trailhead and the air was calm.  So we hiked for about two miles over frozen mud.  We turned north and headed up the ridge. As more the views got better and better we started to feel the wind.  Atop the ridge the wind was pretty strong but it was still fairly warm.  And then came the false summits.  About 4 or 5 of them.  The wind was gale force by the time we reached the peak and the warm day was but a happy memory. We pulled burgers from our packs, took our photo and practically ran back down to warmer weather.  When we hit the bottom of the canyon the mud had thawed and we had quite the slog, each of us carrying at least 5 pounds of mud on our shoes.   High point of the day:  a bald eagle flying low right past us looking for lunch!  

The Mount of Olives

This is a delayed report, but I’m pleased to finally make my first contribution. I was on an archaeological dig in Israel this last summer, and I was determined at some point during my stay to consume my first summit cheeseburger.

I hiked over 200 miles while there. My first journey was a high-mileage, one night trip from Nazareth to the kibbutz I was staying at just northwest of the Sea of Galilee (not far from Capernaum, the Mount of Beatitudes, etc.). The second leg was a six day, 160+ mile trip from Nazareth to Jerusalem—essentially accomplishing my idea of hiking from Galilee to Jerusalem and seeing a side of Israel tourists don’t really get. Unfortunately, though I did summit a few peaks, some quite famous, I wasn’t adequately prepared to consume a cheeseburger on these peaks. All along, however, I knew there was at least one peak I would get before leaving—The Mount of Olives.

Though the Mount of Olives certainly has holy connotations and contains a number of areas sacred to various peoples, in general it is just a normal, urbanized area. I hope no one finds my selection of peak offensive, but a cheeseburger must be eaten on every summit. Due to the mount’s fame, I thought it a prime candidate upon which to consume my first summit cheeseburger. After hearing my plan, a friend I had made just the day before wanted to be part of this historical moment. Assuming the local McDonald’s was kosher (as many in Israel are), I planned on purchasing some cheese for my burger from a grocer in the Old City near where I was staying. I was pleasantly surprised when the McDonald’s worker asked me if I wanted cheese on my burger. I guess that one isn’t kosher after all. Cheeseburgers in hand, on July 9, 2012, we made the trek across the city and up to the top of the Mt. of Olives. Right next to the top is a great observation point from which we took most of our pictures. Our actions of course provoked many odd looks and questions from other tourists. Though they thought we were strange, we still got a couple to take pictures of us.

I’m proud to finally contribute a cheeseburger summit, especially since I believe it is the first summit to be conquered not only in Israel/Palestine, but the entire Middle East.

Summit Cheeseburger meets Jerusalem

Touch-Me-Not and Cabot Mountains in NY's Catskills

On Saturday, I led a hike for Schenectady ADK to Touch-Me-Not and Cabot Mountains, two small peaks in the western Catskills.

It seemed like a long drive to Little Pond State Campground, south of Pepacton Reservoir and southwest of Margaretville, but it was really only about 2 hours.  We parked outside the closed campground gate, and walked in to the start of the blue trail up Touch-Me-Not, a fairly steep and relentless climb of about 700 feet.  There was lots of recent blowdown along the way as a result of recent high winds and coastal storms, and we cleared what we could without any tools.

Stopping at the summit for the requisite cheeseburger, there was no view except the trees around us.


 

Beyond the summit, we turned west on the red-marked Finger Lakes Trail for the short walk to the base of the even steeper climb up Cabot Mountain.  Though this climb was only about 400 feet, the steepness and the slippery downed leaves made for slow going.  There was a nice viewpoint near the summit, but the air was so hazy that views were not all that good.


 

After lunch and a second cheeseburger at the summit, we descended via the yellow trail, through the ruins of an old farmstead, and back to Little Pond.  From there it was an easy walk along the pond past campsites and back to the cars.  (I'll add this post to Cabot once my addition to the database is approved by the Big Cheese)

Not a very photogenic day, so no pictures, but it had been a good hike with friends on a better than expected weather day.

Touch-Me-Not and Cabot Mountains in NY's Catskills

On Saturday, I led a hike for Schenectady ADK to Touch-Me-Not and Cabot Mountains, two small peaks in the western Catskills.

It seemed like a long drive to Little Pond State Campground, south of Pepacton Reservoir and southwest of Margaretville, but it was really only about 2 hours.  We parked outside the closed campground gate, and walked in to the start of the blue trail up Touch-Me-Not, a fairly steep and relentless climb of about 700 feet.  There was lots of recent blowdown along the way as a result of recent high winds and coastal storms, and we cleared what we could without any tools.

Stopping at the summit for the requisite cheeseburger, there was no view except the trees around us.


 

Beyond the summit, we turned west on the red-marked Finger Lakes Trail for the short walk to the base of the even steeper climb up Cabot Mountain.  Though this climb was only about 400 feet, the steepness and the slippery downed leaves made for slow going.  There was a nice viewpoint near the summit, but the air was so hazy that views were not all that good.


 

After lunch and a second cheeseburger at the summit, we descended via the yellow trail, through the ruins of an old farmstead, and back to Little Pond.  From there it was an easy walk along the pond past campsites and back to the cars.  (I'll add this post to Cabot once my addition to the database is approved by the Big Cheese)

Not a very photogenic day, so no pictures, but it had been a good hike with friends on a better than expected weather day.

Another visit to La Jolla; another Cheeseburger Summit

<!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]-->

<!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--><!--[if !mso]> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <![endif]-->

While visiting my inlaws in La Jolla, my husband Tom wanted to do a hike around Torrey Pines State Park (which was beautiful with wonderful views of the Pacific), so I took the opportunity to see if there were any summits nearby.  Lo and behold, Carmel Mountain was only a few miles away.  It was a bit difficult to find a fast food burger joint in any of the high end shopping malls around Torrey Pines, but luckily, McDonald’s came through.  A short drive through fancy neighborhoods took us to the Ocean Air Recreation Center and access to trails leading close to Carmel Mountain.  Unfortunately, the trails were not to the peak (more like a mesa), so I had to bushwhack through briars and California buckwheat--which Tom decided to forego (not being a true Cheeseburger summiteer).  I was able to consume the cheeseburger and document the summit with scraped up legs to prove it.

View of the Pacific from Torrey Pines State Park

The briar patch that I had to ford to get to the peak.

Cheeseburger on top.

Round rocks everywhere on the mesa (moki balls?)

Sunset and green flash from the in-law's deck, after conquering another cheeseburger summit.

"A" Mountain

This being my first summit out in my new environment, Arizona, was exciting for the new chapter of my life. I was visiting my brother in Tucson and we decided for dinner we would have burgers on "A" Mountain. On the side of the mountain there is a giant A that students back in the day made and painted for the U of A. We had intended on doing a different summit but a long nap (taken by my brother) put that summit on hold. As we hiked to the top we realized we probably should have worn better shoes. Flip flops just don't work too well for hiking. It was about sunset and I couldn't have asked for better scenery for a dinner and a completed summit. Until next time...

       

Eagle Mountain, MN. Another one of the '50' meets its match.

The dream is now a reality.  All two-thousand-two-hundred-ninety-seven feet of Minnesota's highest point have fallen victim to the mighty machine better known as Summit Cheeseburger.  

"I'm not hungover, it's just altitude sickness" was to be the theme of our Saturday morning hike.  Three hours of driving followed by three miles of hiking separated us from our place in the Minnesota history books.  Our hike began in the midst of a dense fog with some drizzle in the forecast, but we were not to be denied.  So determined was David, that prior to the hike, he swapped out his tennis shoes in favor of golf shoes.  Something about 'getting better traction'...

The fog was certain to rob us of the million-dollar view atop the summit, but the haze that surrounded us during the hike seemed to intensify the situation, the interesting light that was cast across the forest floor was so unique that it made me temporarily forget that David was indeed wearing golf shoes.

As the path wound deeper into the hardwoods, we entered the famous Boundary Waters Canoe Area.  Though not visible in the photo, the fine print on the signed gave fair warning that hang gliders were not allowed.  Dissapointing, but it said nothing about golf shoes, so we moved forward.

We pressed on into the mist, and the hangovers altitude sickness was ever-present as we climbed into oblivion.  At last we stood face to face with our dream.

A kitchen was prepared, and several groups of curious hikers followed their noses to the peak, making this a successful advocacy mission as well.  But the real news here is summed up in the photo below:

You'll be hearing from us again.